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Elementary Science Education

Materials for Lessons B-2 to B-12

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      Nebel
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      All Inclusive Materials List
      (Lessons B-2 through B-12)

      Note: These lists do not include photographs, or diagrams that may be called for in presenting the lesson. These may be found online by Googling under the terms given in the text. Eventually, url’s for such photographs and diagrams will be provided for under each individual lesson under the tag, enhancements. Your help in providing these will be appreciated.

      All lessons should involve students in taking notes and/or making diagrams according to their abilities. Therefore, always equipping them with suitable paper/notebooks and writing instruments is assumed.

      B-2. Distinguishing Living or Biological, Natural Earth, and Human-Made Things

      Part 1
      1 Poster paper
      1 Fine tipped Sharpie™ (or any marker to write categories on boxes)
      1 Tongs (OPTIONAL, if gathering items best not touched)
      Table salt (a teaspoon, to represent the exception in foodstuff)
      Flour (a teaspoon of any type cooking flour to represent foodstuff, OR any other type basic cooking ingredient)
      3 Cardboard boxes (OPTIONAL, 3 boxes big enough to put collected items in, or label sheets of paper and designate areas)
      1 Pencil (or pen, to write items impractical to collect, on cards)
      1 Rubber party balloon (to blow up and represent the air inside)
      1 Shopping bag (any type, to gather assorted items in)
      1 Gloves (OPTIONAL, if gathering items best not touched)
      Living or Biological things (as many items as you wish, perhaps a dozen more or less,  read text for examples)
      Natural Earth things (as many items as you wish, perhaps a dozen more or less,  read text for examples)
      Human-made things or materials (as many items as you wish, perhaps a dozen more or less,  read text for examples)
      15 Index cards (any size, as many as you desire to write things on that are impractical to collect)
      1 Apple (or any food item without packaging)
      Part 2
      1 Pocket magnifier (minimal 5x magnifier, 10x even better)
      Living or Biological things (collections from Part 1)
      Natural Earth things (collections from Part 1)
      Human-made things or materials (collections from Part 1)
      1 Artificial flower (or artificial leaf to compare to a real one)
      1 Flower  (or real leaf to compare to an artificial one)
      Part 3
      No additional materials needed

      B-3. The Plant and Animal Kingdoms: Distinguishing Between Plants and Animals

      Part 1
      1 Poster paper
      1 Fine tipped Sharpie™ (or any marker, to label cardboard boxes)
      2 Cardboard boxes (large enough to place collected items and/or photos/cards in)
      Living or Biological things (have student gather photos of plants and animals, best if educator reads text for ideas, use actual animals/plants at your discretion)
      Part 2
      Lined white notebook paper, 3-hole-punched (for student to take notes on regarding attributes)
      1 Poster board (a large piece poster board, or chalk for board for educator to write lists of features on)
      1 Fine tipped Sharpie™ (or any marker to write on poster board, or chalk if using chalk board)
      1 Pencil (or pen for student to write with)
      Plant Kingdom collection (from Part I)
      Animal Kingdom collection (from Part I)
      Part 3
      Lined white notebook paper, 3-hole-punched (or student’s science notebook to write in)
      1 Bowl (OPTIONAL, any small bowl with cover to keep earthworm in)
      1 Matches or lighter (to light peels with)
      Water (OPTIONAL, a small amount to keep earthworm dirt moist)
      Orange peels (peels must be well-dried, or potato or other well-dried peels will work)
      Dirt (OPTIONAL, to put in bowl for earthworm, also a few teaspoons of well-dried dirt to show it will not burn)
      1 Package of “plant food” (any package of plant food)
      1 Pencil (or pen, for student to write with)
      1 Stone (OPTIONAL, any stone from outside to show that it will not burn)
      1 Ashtray (to place peels and other items in to burn)
      1 Earthworm (OPTIONAL, a live earthworm)
      Lettuce (OPTIONAL, a small piece of wilted lettuce to feed earthworm)

      B-4. Life Cycles

      Part 1
      No materials needed
      Part 2
      2 Jars (OPTIONAL, for your own fruit flies, must be clear and the same size)
      1 Burner or hot plate (OPTIONAL for tadpoles, to boil lettuce in for food)
      Water (OPTIONAL for tadpoles, if tap water must sit 24 hours, pond water from pond with tadpoles is even better. Also water as needed to boil lettuce in)
      1 Rubber band (OPTIONAL, large enough to put around mouth of jar to hold cover cloth)
      1 Plastic open container (OPTIONAL for tadpoles, any container to scoop tadpoles/frog eggs up and carry them in safely)
      Grass (OPTIONAL for tadpoles, pulled up with roots, or weeds with roots to put in with tadpoles)
      1 Flower (OPTIONAL, a lily flower if possible to show parts)
      Lettuce (OPTIONAL, romaine lettuce for tadpoles, boiled for 15 minutes)
      1 Fish tank (OPTIONAL for tadpoles, or a large roast pan)
      Gravel (OPTIONAL for tadpoles, enough to put on bottom of tank, and/or sand/mud)
      3 Rocks (OPTIONAL for tadpoles, a few rocks large enough to be above surface of water)
      Frog eggs or tadpoles (OPTIONAL)
      1 Live butterfly kit (OPTIONAL, any type, can be ordered on the internet)
      1 Fruit fly culture kit (or you can attract your own fruit flies, see OPTIONAL supplies)
      Banana (OPTIONAL to attract your own fruit flies, a piece of banana)
      1 Handkerchief (OPTIONAL for your own fruit flies or any piece of cloth to rubber band on jar top)
      Part 3 No materials needed
      Part 4 No materials needed

      B4-A. Identification of Living Things and Why Plants and Animals Live Where They Do

      Part 1
      Plastic wrap (clear, enough to wrap collections/speciments in for scrapbook)
      1 Fine tipped Sharpie™ (or any pen to use to label collections/specimens)
      Cardboard (a few pieces of cardboard to dry plants)
      1 Seed catalog (of garden plants and flowers)
      Glue (any type to attach index card and plastic wrapped specimens in scrapbook)
      20 Index cards (3×5 cards, as many as you need to use to glue on scrapbook page to label the leaves)
      Leaves (have student gather as many leaves as they like over time to identify and perhaps mount in a collection)
      1 Field guide of trees in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)
      1 Field guide of flora in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)
      1 Field guide of fauna in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)
      1 Field guide of birds in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)
      1 Field guide of insects in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)
      1 Phone book (or other large heavy book to press and dry speciments)
      1 Brick  (or other heavy object to put on top of phone book so specimens are pressed flat)
      1 Scrapbook binder with many blank pages (new, large sized scrapbook in which to place and label collections/specimens)
      1 Bird feeder (whichever type you choose, placed so as to observe birds)
      Bird seed (whatever type(s) you like, to attract various birds to observe)
      1 Binoculars (OPTIONAL, but would be helpful to observe birds, etcetera)
      Part 2
      1 Seed catalog (of garden plants and flowers to view variance in requirements to grow, i.e. sunny, shady, wet, dry)
      1 Field guide of trees in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)
      1 Field guide of flora in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)
      1 Field guide of fauna in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)
      1 Field guide of birds in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)
      1 Field guide of insects in your region (a used copy is likely available, or one can be borrowed/shared)

      B-5 Concepts of Adaptations, Food Chains, and Energy Flow

      Part 1 No materials listed
      Part 2 No materials listed
      Part 3
      111 Pasta pieces (3 different shapes, to demonstrate in the ratio of 100:10:1. Extra pasta pieces to demonstrate larger amounts are optional)
      Part 4 No materials needed

      B5-A. Adaptations and Survival
      Part 1 No materials needed
      Part 2 No materials needed
      Part 3 No materials needed

      B-6. How Animals Move I: The Skeleton and Muscle System

      Part 1
      1 Human skeleton model (OPTIONAL)
      Part 2
      1 Chair (for student to sit in as instructed)
      1 Table (or desk for student to press forearm on and under as instructed)
      1 Human muscular system model (OPTIONAL)

      B-7. How Animals Move II: Different Body Designs; Major Animal Phyla

      Part 1
      1 Animal skeleton (OPTIONAL, as many as possible from various animals)
      Part 2
      1 Crab (OPTIONAL, or other arthropod for dissection)
      Part 3
      1 Paper towel
      Water (enough to moisten paper towel for earthworm)
      1 Pottery clay (or play dough, an egg-sized ball)
      1 Earthworm

      B-8. How Animals Move III: Coordinating Body Movements; The Nervous System

      Part 1 No materials needed

      B-9. How Animals Move IV: Energy to Run the Body (Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology)
      Part 1 No materials listed
      Part 2 No materials listed
      Part 3 No materials listed
      Part 4 No materials listed

      B-10. Plant Science I: Basic Plant Structure and Reproduction
      Part 1
      1 Starter plant (Several plants is OPTIONAL, but recommended for comparison. Any plant(s) can be purchased or you can grow your own)
      1 Carrot (a whole carrot to demonstrate another type of root)
      Grass (a little pulled from ground with roots attached, and/or a dandelion)
      Newspaper (to use under plant, to contain dirt and mess)
      Part 2 No materials listed
      Part 3
      1 Pocket magnifier (to view dandelion or daisy with)
      1 Flower (any large-sized flower(s) student can dissect and see parts of – a local florist will likely give you a discarded one for free)
      1 Dandelion (or a daisy flower)
      Fruit (OPTIONAL, a variety of fruits, including berries, to view seed types)
      Part 4
      1 Compound microscope (40x-400x) (OPTIONAL, to view fern spores if available)
      1 Pocket magnifier (OPTIONAL, to view cones, fern and moss)
      2 Pine cones (OPTIONAL, if possible one male and one female to compare)
      1 Fern (OPTIONAL, any fern to view spores)
      Moss (OPTIONAL, piece of moss pulled up in springtime to view spores)

      B-11. Plant Science II: Germination, Seedling Growth And Responses

      Part 1
      Lined white notebook paper, 3-hole-punched (or student’s science notebook to write in)
      6 Paper towels (enough to place under and over seeds on dinner plate or saucer)
      1 12-inch ruler (to measure seed growth)
      Water (enough to dampen paper towels)
      2 Dinner plates or saucers (to germinate seeds on one and use other as cover)
      Seed (seeds of various kinds: radish, sunflower, beans and peas work especially well, but other species will also serve and may add to the lesson)
      1 Pencil (or pen for student to write with)
      Part 2
      Lined white notebook paper, 3-hole-punched (or student’s science notebook to write in)
      1 12-inch ruler (to measure plant growth)
      Potting soil (enough to use in 2 plastic cups to plant seed in)
      Water (enough to initially wet soil, plus keep watering 2 plants over course of time)
      Seed (same types of seeds used in Part 1)
      2 Plastic cups (must be clear with tapered shape – wide at top to more narrow base – to plant seeds in)
      1 Cardboard box (if needed, large enough to cover plastic cup to keep it in dark)
      1 Pencil (or pen for student to write with)
      Part 3
      Lined white notebook paper, 3-hole-punched (or student’s science notebook to write in
      1 Scissors (or exacto knife to cut slit in cardboard box)
      1 12-inch ruler (to measure plant growth)
      Potting soil (enough to use in 5 or more plastic cups to plant seed in)
      Water (enough to wet soil and maintain all plants)
      Seed (same types of seeds as for Parts 1 & 2)
      5 Plastic cups (same type clear tapered cups as in Parts 1 & 2; how many you use is up to you)
      1 Wax pencil (to write on side of plastic cup)
      Onion bag netting material (or mesh-type material, enough to secure on top of cup to hang upside down)
      1 Plastic bag (must be clear, baggie type, large enough to fit over pot)
      1 Cardboard box (roughly a foot on each side or larger)
      1 Rubber band (to securely fasten onion mesh on top of plastic cup)
      1 Pencil (or pen for student to write with)
      ·
      B-12. Plants, Soil, Water, and Erosion

      Part 1
      1 Bowl (deep enough that starter pot can be immersed to top of soil level)
      3 Seedling starter pots
      Potting soil (enough for 2 of the starter pots)
      Water (enough to pour in immersion bowl and maintain water level over time, and to soak and enough for  2 other pots)
      Seed (your choice of peas, beans, sunflowers, or squash however use the same type seed in each pot)
      Sand (coarse sand, enough to put in 1 starter pot)
      Part 2
      2 Seedling starter pots (you will continue to use the 3 starter pots from Part 1, in addition 2 more are optional as stated in text)
      Potting soil (dry potting soil, enough for starter pot)
      Water (enough to pour in immersion bowl and maintain water level over time, and to soak and enough for 2 other pots)
      2 Measuring cups (clear, marked in milliliters, with lip to pour with. 1 cup needed to catch overflow)
      Sand (any coarse dry sand, enough for starter pot)
      Part 3
      Garden top soil (enough to pack onto dish draining pad, and also to put in small pile to blow on)
      1 Sprinkling can (to pour water from onto dirt on dish draining pad)
      Water (enough to pour over dirt packed on dish draining pad)
      1 Dish draining pad (a light color is best)

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